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Do Guests Actually Need Closets? Here’s an Alternative. And it’s Cool.

 

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by Mercedes Brennan in BEAUTIFULLY USEFUL, RESOURCES, SPACE SAVERS, STORAGE
February 7, 2014
Commune's Villa Room has kimono rack

Owners often lament the closet problem – where do they put their personal possessions when guests are renting their vacation rentals? Many resort to cramming an ungodly amount of stuff into a few closets, locking them up and then leaving the rest empty for guests.

Commune's Villa Room has kimono rack

Kengo Kuma’s Bamboo Wall house in Commune by the Great Wall in China, features a kimono rack for draping clothing. Notice how the simplicity of the rack enhances the room.

But, do guests actually need a closet?

I will not argue the fact that guests do appreciate closets, but rarely does a guest bring such a huge amount of clothes that they take up an entire closet, shelves and all.

There’s an alternative. And it’s not often used in our industry. But it often does the trick.

It’s the clothes rack.

I’m not talking cheap, aluminum ones that we used in college because we lived in un-bedrooms, but the gorgeous ones. The kind that actually enhance a room.

Here are the advantages.

  1. When guests use a clothes rack,  they rarely leave their clothes behind. After all, they are hanging right out in the open and thus are hard to miss when packing up.
  2. Owners don’t have to sacrifice their closets to visiting guests. They can keep the bedroom closet chicly locked up (or not) and not have to move their own personal belongings out of the bedroom. This is especially nice for owners who only occasionally rent out their homes or rooms in their homes.
  3. The last advantage applies to vacation home stays with especially small rooms.  Why not do away with a closet all together and be rewarded by a lot more space in the bedroom? Getting rid of a jutting out, awkward closet awards some breathing space and with a nice, chic clothing rack and a chest of drawers, there is always a place for guests’ clothing.

Here are some racks worth considering:

Restoration Hardware has a number of vintage racks. This one comes in both a large and small version:

Vintage Tailor's Rack by Restoration Hardware

Handcrafted from foundry-cast iron and distressed by hand, Restoration Hardware’s Vintage Tailor’s Rack re-creates the character and quality of tailor’s racks used a century ago. Ample strength makes them a practical choice for hanging garments and stacked cases, and their authentic welded joinery, ball finials and arched bases elevate them to a chic bedroom accessory. $895

Factory 20’s salvaged wood rack has a British Colonial vibe:

Vintage Rolling Garment Rack

Factory 20’s USA, 1920s, Vintage Industrial Columbia Factory Clothiers Rolling Garment Display Rack is made of old growth wood construction. Notice the turned dowel hanging garments. This one has a bottom shelf to hold shoes or suitcases. $1,560

For a more Asian vibe, look for a kimono rack. They can be found in antique shops and Asian retailers. Keep in mind that some of these are a bit more delicate so be sure to test them out before placing them in a bedroom for heavy use. Here is one listed on eBay:

Vintage Steel and Wood, on Etsy, offers fabulous clothing racks, based on vintage designs and the prices can’t be beat.

Garment Rack made of steel and wood

Called the East West Clothing Rack, this little gem is modeled with a slightly Asian vibe. I love the shelf at the top for handbags, tablet computers, iPhones and toiletry bags. $270 from Vintage Steel and Wood on Etsy.

Houzz also offers a fetching and inexpensive Victorian era reproduction:

Garment Rack by Crash Industrial Supply

The Sofia Garment Rack by Crash Industrial Supply features a sleek steel frame finished in antique nickel and embellished with ornate molding. It brings a flawless combination of industrial and Victorian-era style to your space. $375 on Houzz.com

Oilfield Slang, a Dallas furniture manufacturer,  makes reclaimed wood and steel industrial racks. Founder Katie Katzenmeyer encourages her customers to customize their own rack, which is awesome. Here is her shabby-chic Large Plain Jane rack:

Industrial Rack by Oilfield Slang

Plain Jane is made entirely of reclaimed raw materials. Each component of the product is hand selected, cut, threaded, sanded and metal is reinforced through a bluing & welding process, guaranteeing superior strength and durability. Built to withstand heavy retail use. $352.77.

My recommendation when buying a rack is that it be gorgeous and sturdy enough to hold lots of clothes. Those made for industrial purposes are probably your best bet.

Oh! And don’t forget to provide beautiful hangers on your rack. Here are some vintage hotel wood ones offered on Etsy from J B Hoffman II:

Hotel Hangers from the 1940'd and 1950's

J B Hoffman II, an Etsy shop, offers an instant collection of four wooden hangers “swiped” from hotel rooms decades ago ranging from the 1930’s into the 1960’s
They include: Cabana Hotel in Palo Alto, California, The Harrison Hot Springs Hotel in BC, Canada, Hotel Commodore Perry in Toledo, Ohio and Hotel Benson in Portland, Oregon

 

 

GET THE FREE LIST OF SHORT-TERM RENTAL ESSENTIAL ITEMS

THE 31 MUST-HAVE ESSENTIALS THAT GUARANTEE GUSHING GUEST REVIEWS

On the house!
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